Archives For poverty

Fanny is taking a leap forward

Suddenly raising seven children

When Fanny’s sister passed away, leaving four children behind, the choice was clear—she had to adopt them. Already a single mother, Fanny suddenly found herself the sole provider for seven school-age children.

IMG_6345-Fanny-blog

As one of Malawi’s 2 million small-scale farmers, Fanny set her mind to working hard, knowing that her efforts meant nourishment for her children. She managed to meet her family’s basic needs but struggled to find money for school fees or even soap. “Some months, I wouldn’t have money at all,” she says.

When Fanny heard about savings groups forming at her church, she recalls, “I was the first to sign up.” Saving small amounts of money with her group, Fanny no longer needed to sell her own family’s food for extra cash. It was the boost she needed to leap forward.

Refusing to give up

When severe flooding in early 2015 rendered 230,000 Malawians homeless, Fanny’s crops and home were washed away. Despite the devastating loss, Fanny quickly moved in with her sister next door and used her savings to launch a side business selling used clothing. Even though she lost everything, she determinedly began to rebuild her home.

Less than a year after the floods, Fanny did something few in her community have been able to afford: she paid to install a water tap next to her home to help with irrigation and household chores.

“I can say this is my testimony,” Fanny says. “Before the savings group, I had no business of my own, and my children were suffering from hunger. But now, I am rebuilding my own house, and my goal is to see my children educated.”

DSC_4926-Fanny-blog

DSC_4912-Fanny-blog

DSC_4940-Fanny-blog

DSC_4940-Fanny-blog

A place to belong

IMG_6340-Fanny-blog

Joining the savings group has not only provided financial stability for Fanny; it has brought her closer to God and to friends in her community.  An active member of her church, Fanny leads worship and visits those who are ill or grieving. Eager to give back, Fanny’s savings enable her to bring offerings to church—something she wasn’t able to do before.

Fanny’s savings group has given her a sense of belonging. “My challenges have grown less because I am supported,” she says. “My fellow group members encourage me and pray for me. … Since I joined the group, I’m a more joyful person.”

HOPE GIFT CATALOG

Help entrepreneurs leap forward!

Like Fanny, millions of men and women are bursting with skills and talents but lack access to the financial tools needed to leap forward along the path out of poverty. Choose items from HOPE’s gift catalog to play a role in helping families flourish!

SHOP NOW

DuHope-Women-Fanny-blog

Free bracelet!

With your donation of $25 or more, you’ll receive a leather bracelet, hand-crafted by Rwandan entrepreneurs!*

*Bracelets are available while supplies last.

Today, thousands will mark their hands with a bright red “X,” demonstrating their commitment to ending modern slavery. Since 2013, the END IT movement, a coalition of leading organizations committed to shining a light on slavery, which can include sex trafficking, bonded labor, and forced labor.

In many countries throughout the HOPE network, we serve a population that is vulnerable to human trafficking and forced labor. Traffickers prey on those living in poverty, and several of the countries in which we work have some of the most prominent human trafficking industries in the world. While HOPE does not work directly with anti-trafficking agencies, our work in poverty alleviation addresses many of the root causes of modern slavery. Our approach is to move upstream from the problem in an attempt to prevent the conditions and vulnerability that traffickers prey on. Here’s how:

1. Jobs create opportunities.
With few options to provide for their families, many people living in poverty willingly enter bonded labor. Or, they are baited with the promise of a job in another country, realizing upon arrival that they’ve been lied to. Even more tragically, families in destitute financial situations are often forced to give up one child to feed the rest of their family.* When families have meaningful work to support themselves, they are spared from making these kinds of decisions.

Continue Reading…

by Tyson Presnell, HOPE Field Communications Fellow

A journal entry after visiting a savings group in Lilongwe, Malawi

As I stand up to clear off the table, I carry a strange assortment of foods to the pantry: a pumpkin, peanuts (known here as groundnuts), beans, and eggs. You’d think I had just come from the grocery store or stopped at a roadside stand. No, this food was special. It was from my clients.

I traveled to this savings group on the outskirts of Lilongwe, Malawi’s capital. The group was singing as we arrived. Their group name was fitting: Chimwemwe, which is Chichewa for happiness. After we were introduced to the group, they continued their worship. Following a short message on the importance of prayer, it was time for the savings portion of the meeting. The group chose to worship while turning in their savings because they saw it as a time to celebrate. Continue Reading…

Last month, over 200 golfers joined HOPE International in York, PA, at the Heritage Hills Golf Resort, for a beautiful and sunny day of golf! We are so grateful to our sponsors who helped us make the day a success, and we hope you’ll join us in 2016 for our 16th annual “Drive out Poverty” golf tournament on Friday, September 23. A special thank you to the following sponsors:

Community Banker sponsors

Domuss, Ltd.

Heritage Hills Golf Resort

Men of Iron

Merrill Lynch, The Swift Group

Residential Mortgage Services

Regional Champion sponsors

Advanced Insurance Solutions

Apple Nissan

Esbenshade’s Greenhouse

Hostetler & Church, LLC

Shepherd Real Estate LLC

Stewart Title Guarantee

Susquehanna Bank

Dignity sponsors

Akron Insurance

Associated Insurance Management

Barkas, Inc.

Conestoga Title Insurance Company

Fidelity National Title Insurance

Kaplin Stewart

McKonly & Asbury, LLP

mRelevance

Pine View Enterprises, Inc.

The Simkiss Companies

VAL-CO

Wells Fargo

Empowerment Promoter sponsors

Bare Wealth Advisors

BB’s Grocery Outlet

B.R. Kreider & Son, Inc.

Finance of America

Horst Realty

Lamar King Tournament within a Tournament

Lancaster Mortgage Company

Lesher Mack Sales & Service Inc

M&T Bank

Martin’s Trailside Express

Morgan Stanley

Realty 1

Ron Thompson

Sharp Shopper

Select Security

Speedwell Construction, Inc.

UGI

Weaver Energy, Inc.

Adventure Capitalist sponsor

Aero Energy

Convene

Master’s Advisors, Inc.

Metro Bank

Mid Penn Bank

Modern Eyes Optical

RP Electric

Startup sponsor

Abel Construction

Black Rock Financial Management

Donegal Insurance Group

EK Bare and Sons

Ivy Funds

L Star Management

Lori Miller

Markley Actuarial Services

Pikeland Construction, Inc.

Prudential

RS Investments

Voya

Waterford Management, LLC

Wilkinson Homes, LLC

Akron Insurance

Associated Insurance Management (AIM)

Barkas, Inc.

Conestoga Title Insurance Company

Fidelity National Title Insurance

Kaplin Stewart

McKonly & Asbury, LLP

mRelevance ($4,400)

Pine View Enterprises, Inc.

The Simkiss Companies

VAL-CO

Wells Fargo

Use your power. Ask them for whatever you want. You’ll be surprised at how eager they are to please you.

This, explained the instructor, was how we, six representative shopkeepers, were to deal with the other 120 participants in this 30-minute game meant to simulate the social and economic realities for millions of families who live in extreme poverty.

The setup was simple. An open conference room outfitted with plastic tarps, one per family unit, supplied with newspaper and a bucket of water and flour paste. To pay for rent, food, and perhaps health care, these families would make paper bags. These were then sold to shopkeepers like myself in units of 10.

While the setup was simple, the psychology of the game proved to be anything but. As shopkeepers, we were informed that in this game we held the power over the families. We were to pay little for their product. So little that most families couldn’t afford to pay their exorbitant rent at the end of the 10-minute “week.” We could yell and demand extra favors. Our job was not only to cheat, but also to systematically and emotionally oppress their will to do anything but hopelessly make more bags.

The simulation began with loud rock music. We walked between the frantic families, hunkered over ripped newspaper and paste, clapping and yelling at them: “Work faster!” The first family to approach me bowed respectfully and presented their 10 bags. I paid them well, compared to the next shopkeeper, and consoled myself that I wasn’t THAT bad.

But soon, to my surprise, I changed.

Continue Reading…

by Brant Wilson, Seventh Grader and Experience HOPE Trip Participant

In January, Doug and Amy Wilson traveled with their three sons—Brant (11), Sam (9), and Nate (8)—to the Dominican Republic on an Experience HOPE Trip to learn more as a family about global poverty and ways to address it. Since returning from the D.R., Brant (pictured above, second from left) has spoken on a number of occasions about his experience, and here he shares how the trip shaped his perspective on poverty.

In January of this year, my family and I were sitting in our airplane in Indianapolis, waiting for takeoff. We were first going to fly to New York, then from there we would go to the Dominican Republic. At this point our whole family didn’t really know what to expect, or at least I know I didn’t. It was as if we were about to walk into a cave. We knew we were going in, and we knew nothing bad would happen, but we couldn’t see what was in there. We were venturing into the unknown.

wilson-family-eddWhile in the D.R. we were transported in an old school bus. We traveled on dirt roads, feeling every ditch and crevice, and headed to our first bank meeting. As we pulled into the town, I was shocked by the poverty. Every floor literally was dirt, and the roofs were made out of that wavily bent metal that you pretty much only see on roofs of small huts. As we came to a stop, many Dominican children peered into the windows of our bus, some jumping up and down in excitement. As we were exiting the bus, I remarked to my mom, “I thought this was only in the movies.”

This brings me to my second point. The people we met in the D.R. are, in many ways, very different than us. We don’t ever really see poverty like that, except in the movies. None of us have to worry about the kitchen floor turning to mud every time it rains or all the flies on our food. One of the biggest things that I noticed, though, was how similar we are. Before I went there, I guess I didn’t really view them as people; I viewed them more as numbers. But when I was with Dominicans and heard them speak and saw them play and learn at school, I realized that there really isn’t much difference between myself and them. They all have passions, hobbies, personalities, dreams, and hope. Yes, hope!

This was, I thought, the most amazing part of the trip. No one I met was in despair at their conditions. They all had hope. They all were ready for change, and they all knew what it would take. They knew they would have to work, and they knew it would be hard, but they knew they could do it. This is something we–we who think we have everything compared to them–need. No one I have ever met has had such a beautiful desire in their heart for anything. So next time you look at a chart about poverty, or hear someone talk about how much you have compared to those people, I encourage you not to think about them as numbers, but as people, people that you could probably learn a lesson from. A lesson about hope.

Visit HOPE’s website to learn more about how you and your family can participate in a similar Experience HOPE Trip.

brant-wilsonBrant Wilson is a seventh grader at The Oaks Academy, a Christ-centered school in Indianapolis, IN, that is intentionally racially and economically diverse. He loves music, writing, and most of all, his friends.