Archives For Christ-centered

Fellow innovators and change-makers:

Innovation is hard.

It can be painful, surprising, unexpected, out of control, positive, negative, closely managed, loosely managed, frustrating, life-giving … this list goes on and on with seemingly contradictory adjectives. One thing that innovation is not is avoidable. Things change. As our world and technology continue to move faster and faster, we cannot avoid change for very long. Continue Reading…

By Lydia Koehn, Field Communications Fellow

While HOPE International works in a variety of locations around the world, many groups follow a similar 5W’s meeting structure. Adopted from HOPE’s partner in the Philippines, The Center for Community Transformation (CCT), this simple structure ensures consistency, while also creating space for flexibility. Traveling with CCT savings group facilitators for the past four months, I’ve enjoyed experiencing the unique heart that Filipinos bring to their own culture of savings communities.

2:15 p.m. – After unsticking ourselves from the small motorcycle, the three of us—savings program regional coordinator, volunteer facilitator, and me—begin gingerly descending the sharp rocks, down to the edge of the sea. We pick our way through the narrow path of the fishing village, dodging crowing roosters and scampering children.

2:30 p.m. – We arrive just as the savings group’s treasurer squats down beside a rusty, peg-legged wooden table. I gratefully slip into a sliver of shade and look around at the houses perched precariously on wooden stilts that buckle on the rocks below. Tucked into the shadows beneath their homes, several savings group members sit, smiling back at me while waiting patiently for the meeting to start. Continue Reading…

By Jesse Casler, VP of Finance and Administration

At HOPE, we’re driven by the belief that our God is good and that He desires all people to know Him. This calls us to side with families that have been disenfranchised and overlooked as we share the Good News of Jesus Christ. We’re also driven by the people who carry out HOPE’s mission around the world. HOPE staff members are missionary bankers, human resource professionals, accountants, marketing specialists, administrators, and more who are deeply committed to investing in underserved families. It’s a joy and a privilege to serve alongside so many passionate, talented men and women who are a critical part of this work!

As we work in the world’s underserved communities, we want to see HOPE staff members become lifelong learners and problem solvers who flourish both in the workplace and at home. In the gospel of John, Jesus tells His disciples that He came so they might have life to the full. HOPE’s holistic staff development model encourages men and women to invite Christ into every part of their lives. As ambassadors of Christ, we believe that, regardless of specific roles—whether manager, intern, executive team member, or fellow—staff should be living in the fullness Christ promised.

At HOPE, we’ve chosen a staff development strategy, with the guidance of our friend Malcolm Webber and LeaderSource, which uses two simple frameworks: the 5C’s and RISE. Continue Reading…

Keeping Christ central

A weekly series from HOPE’s director of spiritual integration

It happens all the time. I have the privilege of meeting someone new, and some version of the following conversation occurs.

Me: “Hi, my name is Matthew.”
New Friend: “Hi, Matthew, my name is _______________.” Various types of small talk take place, inevitably leading to: “What do you do for a living?”
Me: “I serve as director of spiritual integration at HOPE International.”
New Friend: Brow furrows, eyes begin to squint, and head tilts a few degrees to the left (I’m not sure why it’s usually left). “Um, so what does that actually mean?”

With few exceptions, introducing the concept of spiritual integration (S.I.) at HOPE to someone new to the organization elicits both confusion and curiosity. This is understandable, since “spiritual integration” is not a department or function in most organizations. Additionally, our western culture naturally divides life into sacred vs. secular activities or physical vs. spiritual realities. This makes the idea of spiritual integration somewhat foreign and potentially counter-intuitive.

Continue Reading…